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Character Education: Interview with Medal of Honor Recipient Sammy Davis (Vietnam)

Thursday, October 5, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm EDT

Hosted by the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation
Sponsored by the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation

WATCH THE EDWEBINAR RECORDING
LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

If you attended the live session, you’ll be emailed a CE certificate within 24 hours of the edWebinar. If you view the recording or listen to the podcast and would like a CE certificate, join The Medal of Honor Character Development Program community and go to the edWebinar Archives folder to take the CE quiz.

Plan for your class to tune in for the on-demand recording with Medal of Honor Recipient Sammy Davis. Sgt. Davis (then Pfc.) distinguished himself while serving at a remote fire support base when the base came under heavy mortar attack together with a fierce ground assault. Students will learn about his extraordinary actions, the values that made his selfless service possible, and the advice he has for how young people can impact the lives of others in a positive way.

This edWebinar, presented by the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation, is an inspiring learning opportunity for middle and high school students to connect directly with an American hero. Interviews with Medal of Honor Recipients are part of the Medal of Honor Character Development Program, a free program that helps students build character and promotes responsible citizenship through a deeper understanding of stories of courage and sacrifice. Before the edWebinar, we encourage teachers to review Davis’ story with their class.

Sammy DavisMedal of Honor Recipient Sammy Davis Citation

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Sgt. Davis (then Pfc.) distinguished himself during the early morning hours while serving as a cannoneer with Battery C, at a remote fire support base. At approximately 0200 hours the fire support base was under heavy enemy mortar attack. Simultaneously, an estimated reinforced Viet Cong battalion launched a fierce ground assault upon the fire support base. The attacking enemy drove to within 25 meters of the friendly positions. Only a river separated the Viet Cong from the fire support base. Detecting a nearby enemy position, Sgt. Davis seized a machine gun and provided covering fire for his gun crew, as they attempted to bring direct artillery fire on the enemy. Despite his efforts, an enemy recoilless-rifle round scored a direct hit upon the artillery piece. The resultant blast hurled the gun crew from their weapon and blew Sgt. Davis into a foxhole. He struggled to his feet and returned to the howitzer, which was burning furiously. Ignoring repeated warnings to seek cover, Sgt. Davis rammed a shell into the gun. Disregarding a withering hail of enemy fire directed against his position, he aimed and fired the howitzer which rolled backward, knocking Sgt. Davis violently to the ground. Undaunted, he returned to the weapon to fire again when an enemy mortar round exploded within 20 meters of his position, injuring him painfully. Nevertheless, Sgt. Davis loaded the artillery piece, aimed, and fired. Again he was knocked down by the recoil. In complete disregard for his safety, Sgt. Davis loaded and fired three more shells into the enemy. Disregarding his extensive injuries and his inability to swim, Sgt. Davis picked up an air mattress and struck out across the deep river to rescue three wounded comrades on the far side. Upon reaching the three wounded men, he stood upright and fired into the dense vegetation to prevent the Viet Cong from advancing. While the most seriously wounded soldier was helped across the river, Sgt. Davis protected the two remaining casualties until he could pull them across the river to the fire support base. Though suffering from painful wounds, he refused medical attention, joining another howitzer crew which fired at the large Viet Cong force until it broke contact and fled. Sgt. Davis’ extraordinary heroism, at the risk of his life, is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the U.S. Army.
Jason RobbinsHost and Interviewer

Jason Robbins earned his Bachelor’s degree in Social Science and his Master’s Degree in Educational Administration. He taught Middle School History for ten years and currently teaches 12th grade Government and Economics at Steele Canyon High School in San Diego, CA.

 

 

Join The Medal of Honor Character Development Program community to network with educators, participate in online discussions, receive invitations to upcoming edWebinars, view past edWebinars, take a quiz to receive a CE certificate for a past edWebinar, and access free resources.

WATCH THE EDWEBINAR RECORDING
CMOH LogoThe Medal of Honor Character Development Program is a free resource that teaches character through stories of the Medal of Honor recipients. The CDP is a cross-curriculum supplement and complies with National/State Common Core standards. The Medal of Honor Character Development Program incorporates the ideals of courage and selfless service into the middle and high school curriculum to build character and promote responsible citizenship.  The program is FREE and includes 50+ lesson plans supported by over 100 video vignettes of the Medal of Honor Recipients themselves, as well as videos of hometown heroes selected by the Medal of Honor Recipients as “Citizen Heroes.”


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