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Character Education: Interview with Medal of Honor Recipient Master Chief Britt K. Slabinski (Afghanistan)

Friday, November 20, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm EST

Character Education: Interview with Medal of Honor Recipient Master Chief Britt K. Slabinski (Afghanistan)

Hosted by the Congressional Medal of Honor Society

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Closed captioning will be added to the recording within 2 weeks of the live presentation.

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Please watch an edWebinar interview with Medal of Honor Recipient Master Chief Britt K. Slabinski. Master Chief Slabinski was awarded the Medal of Honor for risking his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving in Afghanistan.

Interviews with Medal of Honor Recipients are part of the Medal of Honor Character Development Program, a free program that helps middle – high school students build character and promotes responsible citizenship. The Medal of Honor is awarded for “gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of one’s life, above and beyond the call of duty.” Those awarded it drew upon their deepest convictions and values in the most challenging of circumstances. Their examples of courage and sacrifice can inspire us as we face our own challenges.

Master Chief Britt Slabinski was awarded the Medal of Honor for risking his life above and beyond the call of duty while assigned to a Joint Task Force in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM in Afghanistan. When their helicopter was suddenly fired upon his team was forced to crash land into a deep valley. Then-Senior Chief Slabinski repeatedly exposed himself to deadly fire to personally engage the enemy and orient his team’s fires in a furious, close-quarters firefight. After several teammates became casualties, Slabinski maneuvered his team to a more defensible position, directed air strikes in very close proximity to their position, and requested reinforcements. He then carried a seriously wounded teammate through deep snow and led a difficult trek across precipitous terrain while the enemy was engaging them from the surrounding ridges. Throughout the next 14 hours, Slabinski stabilized the casualties and continued to fight until his team was extracted.

Here are ways you can share this inspiring story and interview with your middle – high school students:

  • Share Master Chief Slabinski’s story with your class.
  • Watch the edWebinar above to share and discuss with your class.
  • Take advantage of the free lessons provided by the Medal of Honor Character Development Program. For shortened activities specifically for you to use while learning has shifted to an online format, follow the Character Development Program on Facebook.
  • Please note that students are not permitted to log into the edWebinar, to protect student privacy.

This recorded edWebinar will be of interest to all teachers and school and district leaders for their middle – high school students.

Britt SlabinskiAbout the Presenter

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while assigned to a Joint Task Force in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. In the early morning of 4 March 2002, Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator Slabinski led a reconnaissance team to its assigned area atop a 10,000-foot snow-covered mountain. Their insertion helicopter was suddenly riddled with rocket-propelled grenades and small arms fire from previously undetected enemy positions. The crippled helicopter lurched violently and ejected one teammate onto the mountain before the pilots were forced to crash land in the valley far below. Senior Chief Slabinski boldly rallied his five remaining team members and marshalled supporting assets for an assault to rescue their stranded teammate. During reinsertion the team came under fire from three directions, and one teammate started moving uphill toward an enemy strongpoint. Without regard for his own safety, Senior Chief Slabinski charged directly toward enemy fire to join his teammate. Together, they fearlessly assaulted and cleared the first bunker they encountered. The enemy then unleashed a hail of machine gun fire from a second hardened position only twenty meters away. Senior Chief Slabinski repeatedly exposed himself to deadly fire to personally engage the second enemy bunker and orient his team’s fires in the furious, close-quarters firefight. Proximity made air support impossible, and after several teammates became casualties, the situation became untenable. Senior Chief Slabinski maneuvered his team to a more defensible position, directed air strikes in very close proximity to his team’s position, and requested reinforcements. As daylight approached, accurate enemy mortar fire forced the team further down the sheer mountainside. Senior Chief Slabinski carried a seriously wounded teammate through deep snow and led a difficult trek across precipitous terrain while calling in fire on the enemy, which was engaging the team from the surrounding ridges. Throughout the next 14 hours, Senior Chief Slabinski stabilized the casualties and continued the fight against the enemy until the hill was secured and his team was extracted. By his undaunted courage, bold initiative, leadership, and devotion to duty, Senior Chief Slabinski reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

About the Host

Cathy Ehlers Metcalf joined the Medal of Honor Character Development Program as Vice President of Education in 2015 after serving as a Regional Curriculum Trainer. She now serves as the Executive Director of Education for the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Cathy taught college-level writing for over 33 years in Southern California. Cathy’s father was a World War II Medal of Honor Recipient. Those experiences gave Cathy a great respect for both the Medal of Honor and a passion for service to our Nation’s Veterans.

 

Closed captioning will be added to the recording within 2 weeks of the live presentation.

Join The Medal of Honor Character Development Program community to network with educators, participate in online discussions, receive invitations to upcoming edWebinars, and view recordings of previous programs to earn CE certificates.


CMOHThe Medal of Honor Character Development Program is a curriculum resource built on the values of courage, commitment, sacrifice, citizenship, integrity, and patriotism. Its living history videos and accompanying lessons teach students that ordinary people can meet great challenges and make the world around them a better place. Each lesson highlights skills such as writing, collaboration, and critical thinking. With two available curriculum options (elementary and secondary), the resources are appropriate for K-12 students and beyond. Assignments and activities fit efficiently into existing disciplines, time periods, and schedules.

 

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